1. What is a Bee lawn?

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    Bee on a flower clover against green background

    Bee on a flower clover against green background

    We are experts in turf grass but there is a growing demand for Bee Grass. Turf grass looks great and holds up well around houses but does not appeal to bees.
    “Bee lawns aren’t 100 percent flowers. They have some grass included,” said Mary Meyer, an extension horticulturist and professor with the University of Minnesota. “While bees don’t use grass, humans do. Most flowers, if you start walking on them, will die. Clover will tolerate a bit of foot traffic.”

    “The trend is urban meadows, where homeowners take out their lawns and replace them with diverse wildflowers that can get tall and rangy at the end of the season,” said, Mace Vaughan, pollinator program director for The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation in Portland, Oregon. . “But a nicely mown border around the outside keeps them looking tidy. Add a sign and people know you’re doing it on purpose. Mow in the fall and the whole lawn is cleaned up nicely.”

    So you can dedicate just some of your lawn to broad leaf plants such as clover.

    Contact Plant Solutions to discuss your lawn options.

  2. Tips For Summer Lawn Care – Part 4

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    Weeds, Insects and Diseases.

    Control Weeds

    Summer is the season to get those growing weeds removed before they bloom and disperse seed for next year. Targeted postemergent herbicides are designed to kill broadleaf weeds without harming turf grass, but they must be applied when temperatures will be below 85° F for a few days. Keep in mind that during the heat of summer, ANY product can be damaging to already-stressed lawn grasses, so use sparingly or hand-pull weeds instead.

    Use weed control products when temperatures are under 85 degrees F.

    Insects and Diseases

    • Dormant or drought-stressed summer lawns can be more susceptible to insect infestations, such as chinch bugs, cutworms, armyworms, sod webworms, fire ants, fleas, and mosquitoes. Minor infestations often take care of themselves, but severe problems may require attention.
    • Summer is also the time for fungal diseases, such as powdery mildew and brown patch. Apply fungicide if needed, and avoid watering in the evening to keep nighttime moisture at a minimum.
    • Grubs will begin hatching in your lawn over the summer. If grubs typically cause problems in your lawn, you can begin applying grub control around midsummer.

    By: Julie Day

    Contact Plant Solutions

    We would love to hear from you! Please fill out this form and we will get in touch with you shortly. Call us at (888) 742-8733 or email info@plantsolutionsnj.com

  3. Tips For Summer Lawn Care – Part 3

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    Fertilizer and Heavy Traffic Areas

    Don’t Over Fertilize

    If your lawn is looking straggly in midsummer, resist the urge to fertilize. In fact, it’s best to stop fertilizing about 30 days before your area’s summer temperatures arrive. Applying extra fertilizer in the heat of summer can burn your lawn and create a flush of tender growth that will struggle in the hot summer weather. Never fertilize dormant lawns – wait until they green up in the fall.

    Lawn Tip
    Organic fertilizers are naturally slow-release, and they are much less likely to burn your lawn (or pollute the environment) than chemical fertilizers.

    High-Traffic Areas

    By summer, many lawns begin to show signs of wear, especially in a few popular pathways. Consider installing stepping stones to minimize damage to your grass, and try to minimize traffic on dormant, brittle lawns. If you’re getting plenty of rainfall and your lawn is actively growing, you can apply a bit of fertilizer to these areas to help the blades recover faster.

     

    Contact Plant Solutions

    We would love to hear from you! Please fill out this form and we will get in touch with you shortly. Call us at (888) 742-8733 or email info@plantsolutionsnj.com

  4. Tips For Summer Lawn Care – Part 2

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    Mowing Tips

    • Raise your mower blade in the summer. Taller grass is more drought-tolerant, grows deeper roots, and helps shade the earth to prevent weed seeds from germinating. Cool-season grasses should be mowed at 3”- 4” during the summer, or as high as your blade will go, while warm-season grasses should be mowed at 2”- 3”.
    • Mulching grass clippings helps keep moisture levels steady.
    • Mow regularly, to prevent cutting more than 1/3 of the grass blade at a time. This keeps your grass healthier and prevents the clippings from smothering the grass.
    • Keep mower blades sharp. Make sure your mower is cutting your grass, not tearing it, to minimize stress during hot temperatures.


    Mowing higher means mowing more often.
    By: Julie Day

    Contact Plant Solutions

    We would love to hear from you! Please fill out this form and we will get in touch with you shortly. Call us at (888) 742-8733 or email info@plantsolutionsnj.com

  5. You don’t need to know when to cut your lawn.

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    Here is a great article on how often you should cut your lawn, ignore it, don’t read it, don’t cut your lawn,
    just contact Plant Solutions and we will take care of it.


    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) – With all the rain we’ve had this spring, lawns have never looked better.

    And when we get a dry day or two, it’s usually time to mow.

    No matter when you mow your lawn or how you mow it, the goal in most cases is to just get the job done, especially during a spring when the grass is growing like a Chia Pet.

    But is there such a thing as mowing too much and cutting too short?

    Maggie Reiter is with the University of Minnesota Extension Service.

    She spent a lot of time on golf courses growing up, but not for the golf. She’s a turf grass expert, so she knows just how low your mower can go.

    “The University of Minnesota Extension recommends about 3 inches as a mowing height for a home lawn,” Reiter said.

    Reiter said the average homeowner cuts their lawn too short, down to about 2 1/2 inches.

    But she said the longer your grass grows, the better.

    “More leaf tissue can capture more sunlight for photosynthesis and this promotes deeper rooting,” Reiter said. “And this fosters a healthier turf grass plant that can withstand our environmental stresses.”

    And instead of bagging your grass, Reiter recommends leaving your grass clippings right where they are. It’s like a free lawn treatment filled with nitrogen and phosphorous.

    “If you leave your grass clippings on your lawn for an entire summer, that’s the equivalent of a fertilizer treatment,” she said. “It saves a homeowner time and money as well as reduce their overall environmental footprint.”

    Reiter said you should only cut about 1/3 of the grass blade at a time.

    So if your lawn is at 4 inches, bring it down to 3 when you mow.

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